Delta House, Inc.
Hours/Upcoming Events

Operating Hours

Our administrative staff can be reached Monday through Saturday from 9am to 5pm, at the Snypse-Allen House, adjacent to the museum.
Call to Schedule a Black Heritage Tour.

Parking

The museum's parking lot is conveniently located at the corner of Laney-Walker Boulevard and Phillips Street. Certified public safety officers are on duty during evening and special events.

Guided Museum Tour Times

Tuesday-Saturday
9:30 am, 10:30 am
Closed Noon to 1 pm.
1:00 pm, 2:00 pm, 3:00 pm,
4:00 pm
Reservations are encouraged. Group tours of 10 or more visitors must be booked in advance. The museum is open Sundays only for special events.


Admission Prices

Adults - $7.00
Seniors (62+); military & family - $5.00
Youth 18 years and under - $3.00
Preschool and SEMC members - Free
The museum is handicapped accessible throughout the building.

Trolley Tour Times
(when available)


9:30 am, 10:30 am
1 pm, 2 pm, 3pm


“The Great War Centennial Exhibition, Part II: Honoring River Region African American Contributions”
Through October 27, 2018
details»


Walk With the Spirits
October 6-7, 2018
details»



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Latest News

Little Known Black History Facts

One in four cowboys was Black, despite the stories told in popular books and movies.

Courtesy of PBS.org

In fact, it's believed that the real “Lone Ranger” was inspired by an African American man named Bass Reeves. Reeves had been born a slave but escaped West during the Civil War where he lived in what was then known as Indian Territory. He eventually became a Deputy U.S. Marshal, was a master of disguise, an expert marksman, had a Native American companion, and rode a silver horse. His story was not unique however.

In the 19th century, the Wild West drew enslaved Blacks with the hope of freedom and wages. When the Civil War ended, freedmen came West with the hope of a better life where the demand for skilled labor was high. These African Americans made up at least a quarter of the legendary cowboys who lived dangerous lives facing weather, rattlesnakes, and outlaws while they slept under the stars driving cattle herds to market.

While there was little formal segregation in frontier towns and a great deal of personal freedom, Black cowboys were often expected to do more of the work and the roughest jobs compared to their white counterparts. Loyalty did develop between the cowboys on a drive, but the Black cowboys were typically responsible for breaking the horses and being the first ones to cross flooded streams during cattle drives. In fact, it is believed that the term “cowboy” originated as a derogatory term used to describe Black “cowhands.”



Latest News

Summer Newsletter!

 

 

Community Engagement


The Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History was one of many public venues in 2018 that hosted the 2035 Comprehensive Plan Review. We are continuing the partnership to bring to decision-making closer to the community.

Do you ride the public bus or would like to be a part of a team to learn more about Augusta’s transit system?

The Transportation Planning Section of Augusta Planning and Development Department is currently seeking volunteers to assist The Augusta Public Transit (APT) Department...Learn More!

Augusta Black Heritage
Trolley Tours



$15 per person (includes guided tour of the historic Lucy Craft Laney Museum)

Please call the museum for availability and times.



The Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History Trolley Tour is a two-hour experience that takes patrons to over 25 significant historic sites related to Augusta’s Black history.

For the first time, locals, students, and visitors can experience a comprehensive tour of the rich history of the Laney Walker area.

Conventions, family reunions, and special event tours are welcome.


 

 

 

 

 

About the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History

Ms. Lucy Craft Laney The Lucy Craft Laney Museum is the only African American Museum in the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA, Augusta and its Surrounding Areas). The museum, which opened in 1991, is a small house museum that was the former home of Miss Lucy Craft Laney.

The museum is located in the Historic Laney-Walker District, near the original site of the Haines Normal and Industrial Institute. The mission of the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History is to promote the legacy of Ms. Lucy Craft Laney through arts and history.  We accomplish this awesome task by educating and exposing children and adults of the CSRA, the State and beyond to the arts, history, literature and leadership through exhibits and programs.

The Preservation of a Legacy
Ms. Laney dedicated her life to providing educational opportunities for Black youth in the Augusta area. Ms. Laney was the founder of the Haines Normal and Industrial Institute which was located on the present site of the Lucy Laney Comprehensive High School. She started the first kindergarten for Black children in Augusta and founded the Lamar School of Nursing for Black women.

The Lucy Laney High School, Laney Walker Boulevard (formerly Gwinnett Street) and the Laney Walker North Historic District have all been named in Ms. Laney's honor. Now through the restoration of her home by Delta House, Inc., another important cultural institution has been dedicated in her memory. The museum is open to all.

The mission of the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History is to promote the legacy
of Miss Lucy Craft Laney through art, history, and the preservation of her home.