Delta House, Inc.
Hours/Upcoming Events

Operating Hours

Our administrative staff can be reached Monday through Saturday from 9am to 5pm, at the Snypse-Allen House, adjacent to the museum.
Call to Schedule a Black Heritage Tour.


The museum's parking lot is conveniently located at the corner of Laney-Walker Boulevard and Phillips Street. Certified public safety officers are on duty during evening and special events.

Guided Museum Tour Times

9:30 am, 10:30 am
Closed Noon to 1 pm.
1:00 pm, 2:00 pm, 3:00 pm,
4:00 pm
Reservations are encouraged. Group tours of 10 or more visitors must be booked in advance. The museum is open Sundays only for special events.

Admission Prices

Adults - $7.00
Seniors (62+); military & family - $5.00
Youth 18 years and under - $3.00
Preschool and SEMC members - Free
The museum is handicapped accessible throughout the building.

Trolley Tour Times
(when available)

9:30 am, 10:30 am
1 pm, 2 pm, 3pm

The Legacy of Miss Lucy Craft Laney Exhibition
January 1 - March 28, 2018


“The Women of a New Tribe” Exhibition
March 6 - 31, 2018


Alabama A&M Presents College Night
March 22, 2018


Epoch of Courage Exhibition
April 1, 2018 - June 30, 2018


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Latest News

Annual Heritage Gala

The Meaning of The King Holiday

By Coretta Scott King
Courtesy of

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday celebrates the life and legacy of a man who brought hope and healing to America. We commemorate as well the timeless values he taught us through his example — the values of courage, truth, justice, compassion, dignity, humility and service that so radiantly defined Dr. King’s character and empowered his leadership. On this holiday, we commemorate the universal, unconditional love, forgiveness and nonviolence that empowered his revolutionary spirit.

We commemorate Dr. King’s inspiring words, because his voice and his vision filled a great void in our nation, and answered our collective longing to become a country that truly lived by its noblest principles. Yet, Dr. King knew that it wasn’t enough just to talk the talk, that he had to walk the walk for his words to be credible. And so we commemorate on this holiday the man of action, who put his life on the line for freedom and justice every day, the man who braved threats and jail and beatings and who ultimately paid the highest price to make democracy a reality for all Americans.

The King Holiday honors the life and contributions of America’s greatest champion of racial justice and equality, the leader who not only dreamed of a color-blind society, but who also lead a movement that achieved historic reforms to help make it a reality.

On this day we commemorate Dr. King’s great dream of a vibrant, multiracial nation united in justice, peace and reconciliation; a nation that has a place at the table for children of every race and room at the inn for every needy child. We are called on this holiday, not merely to honor, but to celebrate the values of equality, tolerance and interracial sister and brotherhood he so compellingly expressed in his great dream for America.

It is a day of interracial and intercultural cooperation and sharing. No other day of the year brings so many peoples from different cultural backgrounds together in such a vibrant spirit of brother and sisterhood. Whether you are African-American, Hispanic or Native American, whether you are Caucasian or Asian-American, you are part of the great dream Martin Luther King, Jr. had for America. This is not a black holiday; it is a peoples’ holiday. And it is the young people of all races and religions who hold the keys to the fulfillment of his dream.


Latest News

HIGHLIGHT: The Thompson Farm Field Trip

The first group of Children's Academy to visit Thompson Farms, hosted by co-owner Mr. Charles Thompson, were introduced to a historical treasure not far from the city sites that they know. Thompson Farms, the largest commodity farm operation in Richmond County, produces soybeans, rye, oats, wheat, and corn for commercial use. The family has been well regarded commercial farmers since the late 1800's.

The students and their chaperones were able to interact with the crops in the field, pick fresh vegetables, get an up close sighting of fruit and nut bearing trees, and experience a Savannah River Bluffs home site.

Mr. Thompson explained the use of the mechanized machinery for high volume farming, the role of chemistry in modern farming, the different use of the various crops, and the diversity of crops. The students received complimentary, freshly harvested peanuts as a gift to remember their visit.

The Thompson Family lived nearby the Haines Institute on Calhoun Street in the 1880's. Mr. John Thompson was a charter member of the Augusta Branch, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which formed in 1917. has The Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History heartily thanks Mr. Thompson for his generosity and strengthening ties to the legacy of his family with Miss Laney.

Augusta Black Heritage
Trolley Tours

$15 per person (includes guided tour of the historic Lucy Craft Laney Museum)

Please call the museum for availability and times.

The Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History Trolley Tour is a two-hour experience that takes patrons to over 25 significant historic sites related to Augusta’s Black history.

For the first time, locals, students, and visitors can experience a comprehensive tour of the rich history of the Laney Walker area.

Conventions, family reunions, and special event tours are welcome.







About the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History

Ms. Lucy Craft Laney The Lucy Craft Laney Museum is the only African American Museum in the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA, Augusta and its Surrounding Areas). The museum, which opened in 1991, is a small house museum that was the former home of Miss Lucy Craft Laney.

The museum is located in the Historic Laney-Walker District, near the original site of the Haines Normal and Industrial Institute. The mission of the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History is to promote the legacy of Ms. Lucy Craft Laney through arts and history.  We accomplish this awesome task by educating and exposing children and adults of the CSRA, the State and beyond to the arts, history, literature and leadership through exhibits and programs.

The Preservation of a Legacy
Ms. Laney dedicated her life to providing educational opportunities for Black youth in the Augusta area. Ms. Laney was the founder of the Haines Normal and Industrial Institute which was located on the present site of the Lucy Laney Comprehensive High School. She started the first kindergarten for Black children in Augusta and founded the Lamar School of Nursing for Black women.

The Lucy Laney High School, Laney Walker Boulevard (formerly Gwinnett Street) and the Laney Walker North Historic District have all been named in Ms. Laney's honor. Now through the restoration of her home by Delta House, Inc., another important cultural institution has been dedicated in her memory. The museum is open to all.

The mission of the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History is to promote the legacy
of Miss Lucy Craft Laney through art, history, and the preservation of her home.